Covid-19 and voluntary action: research repository – projects

As part of VSSN’s goal to help maximise the visibility and impact of Voluntary Sector focussed research, we are collating research projects which focus on Voluntary and Community Sector and volunteering responses to, recovery from and implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. If you would like your project to be visible on this webpage, please fill in the form here. It would be great to hear about projects in development as well as those in progress, as this should help to reduce any risk of duplication and open up possibilities of collaboration.

If you would like to update a previous entry then please email web@vssn.org.uk for minor changes, or for major changes resubmit a new version using the form.

The submitted projects are listed below, or can be viewed in this spreadsheet.

 

Third Sector Trends – PI: Tony Chapman

 

Project lead

Tony Chapman

 

Project lead email

tony.chapman@durham.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

St Chads College, Durham University

 

Other project members

The project is owned by Community Foundation Tyne & Wear and Northumberland in collaboration with St Chad’s College, Durham University

 

Work with funding organisations collaboratively over the years as the project has progressed. Including JRF, LBFEW, ESRC, Charity Bank, Garfield Weston Foundation, Power to Change, amongst others.

 

Website (optional)

https://www.communityfoundation.org.uk/knowledge-and-leadership/third-sector-trends-research/

 

Funder, if any

Community Foundation Tyne & Wear and Northumberland, Garfield Weston, Power to Change, JRF

 

Primary research question

Long term study on the structure and dynamics of the third sector in the North of England (started 2008)

 

Methods and type of data

Major surveys undertaken in 2010, 12, 14, 16 and 19.

 

Study of 50 organisations since 2008 in qualitative study

 

Several additional qualitative studies on: borrowing (Charity Bank), supporting small charities (LBFEW), role of trusts and foundations (CFTWN), community business interactions  (Power to Change),  working well with public bodies (ESRC) amongst others

 

Three key words

trends

 

Project status

Published / disseminating

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

With IPPR comparing Covid-19 with recovery from 2008 financial crash using Third Sector Trends Study (TSTS) data

 

https://www.ippr.org/research/publications/third-sector-trends-survey-2020

 

Update of Third Sector Trends 2019 in July 2020 on Covid-19

 

https://www.communityfoundation.org.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Third-

 

Sector-Trends-Covid-19-Impact-Survey-August-2020.pdf

 

A tale of three sectors (conclusion) on how Covid affects organisations of different sizes

 

https://www.communityfoundation.org.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/THIRD-SECTOR-TRENDS-IN-NORTH-EAST-ENGLAND-2020-1-1.pdf

 

The impact of COVID-19 on Nepalese Civil Society: Challenges, Responses, and Opportunities – PI: Dr. Dipendra K C

 

Project lead

Dr. Dipendra K C

 

Project lead email

dipendra@sgs.tu.ac.th

 

Project lead institution

Thammasat University

 

Funder, if any

NGO Federation of Nepal

 

Primary research question

How did COVID-19 impact NGOs? How are NGOs responding to COVID-19? How do NGOs perceive the government’s response?

 

Methods and type of data

First-round  (March – April) of the survey collected response from 209 NGOs on the impact of COVID-19 on the operation and the nature of the response from the NGOs.

 

The second-round (September – October) of the survey aims to collect the response from 400 NGOs on the impact on NGOs, their response to COVID-19, perception on the state of civic space, and the perception of the government’s response. In addition, six focused group discussions and approximately ten elite interviews are planned.

 

Three key words

Impact and Response, NGO, Nepal

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

First Report – https://bit.ly/cso-covid-report

 

The Value of Small Charities during the Covid 19 Pandemic – PI: Chris Dayson

 

Project lead

Chris Dayson

 

Project lead email

c.dayson@shu.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Sheffield Hallam University

 

Other project members

Leila Baker

James Rees (Wolverhampton)

Carol Jacklin-Jarvis (Open University)

Vita Terry, Katie Turner (IVAR)

Ellen Bennett (SHU)

Beth Patmore (Sheffield)

 

Funder, if any

Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales

 

Primary research question

What has been the value of small charities in response to the COVID 19 pandemic?

 

Methods and type of data

Revisiting four case studies localities from the original ‘Value of Small’ study in 2018

 

Three key words

Small Charities; Social value; collaboration and partnership

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Community Responses to COVID-19 – PI: Angus McCabe

 

Project lead

Angus McCabe

 

Project lead email

a.j.mccabe@bham.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham

 

Other project members

Mandy Wilson LTD, Rob Macmillan (Sheffield Hallam University), Angela Ellis-Paine (TSRC), Asif Afridi (brap), Wendy Sugarman Associates, Sarah Boiling Associates, Richard Usher (Just Ideas). Lily O’Flynn and Lucy Oxborrow (Renaisi)

 

Funder, if any

Local Trust

 

Primary research question

How are communities responding to, and recovering from, COVID-19

 

Methods and type of data

Interviews and meeting observation in 26 communities in England. Qualitative data on how communities are responding to, and recovering from, COVID-19. This is also being recoded in a series of short films.

 

Three key words

community, responses, COVID-19

 

Project status

Analysis

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

Early findings blog

https://localtrust.org.uk/news-and-stories/blog/community-responses-to-covid-19-early-research-findings/

 

Rapid Research Papers

https://localtrust.org.uk/insights/research/briefing-1-rapid-research-covid-19/

 

https://localtrust.org.uk/insights/research/briefing-2-rapid-research-covid-19/

 

https://localtrust.org.uk/insights/research/briefing-3-rapid-research-covid-19/

 

Events

https://localtrust.org.uk/news-and-stories/blog/resilience-and-resourcefulness-for-building-strong-communities/

 

The impact of Covid-19 on the foundation and dissolution of charitable organisations – PI: Diarmuid McDonnell

 

Project lead

Diarmuid McDonnell

 

Project lead email

diarmuid.mcdonnell@manchester.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

University of Manchester

 

Other project members

Alasdair Rutherford, alasdair.rutherford@stir.ac.uk, University of Stirling

 

Website (optional)

https://diarmuidm.github.io/charity-covid19/index

 

Primary research question

What is the impact of Covid-19 on the foundation and dissolution of charitable organisations?

 

Methods and type of data

Using comprehensive publicly available data from seven jurisdictions, we examine the impact of Covid-19 on the foundation and dissolution of charitable organisations. We employ an “excess events” analytical approach, comparing the numbers of foundations and dissolutions in 2020 to what we would expect based on the trends from previous years. We reflect on the differential impact of Covid-19 across jurisdictions, as well as attempt to decompose the empirical patterns into two distinct but related factors: the level of applications for foundation and dissolution by charities; and the capacity of the charity regulators to process these applications.

 

Three key words

charity, vulnerability, survival

 

Project status

Analysis

 

Examining the motivations and emotions linked to the formation of a Voluntary sewing group formed – PI: Beverley Gilbert

 

Project lead

Beverley Gilbert

 

Project lead email

b.gilbert@worc.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

University of Worcester

 

Primary research question

Explores the motivations and emotions linked to the formation of a group of predominantly women who volunteered their time, skills and resources to their local community during the UK Covid-19 period of community lockdown.

 

Methods and type of data

Qualitative online questionnaire responses were analysed thematically within a feminist paradigm. 99 research participants completed a JISQ online survey examining their motivations for joining the group and the emotions and feelings linked to group membership and purpose.

 

Three key words

volunteer; emotion; covid-19

 

Project status

Analysis

 

Locally rooted: the place of community organising in time of crisis – PI: Marilyn Taylor / Mandy Wilson

 

Project lead

Marilyn Taylor; Mandy Wilson

 

Project lead email

marilyntaylor6@blueyonder.co.uk; mandy.wilson7@virginmedia.com

 

Project lead institution

Imagine

 

Other project members

Imagine were the learning partners for  the Community Organisers Expansion Programme (2017-20)

 

Primary research question

How has community organising contributed to community responses to COVID-19;

 

Methods and type of data

Interviews and a survey

 

Project status

Published / disseminating

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

http://www.corganisers.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Locally_Rooted-the_place_of_co_in_times_of_crisis.pdf

 

On-line Health & wellbeing support for BAME patients with Type 2 Diabetes – PI: Hamid Lea

 

Project lead

Hamid Lea

 

Project lead email

hamid@acpgroup.org.uk

 

Project lead institution

University of Birmingham

 

Other project members

Lisa Goodson:  l.j.goodson@bham.ac.uk University of Birmingham

Ashiana Community Project:  shafique@acpgroup.org.uk

 

Funder, if any

University of Birmingham

 

Primary research question

To identify how best to deliver a GP based Type 2 Diabetes Health and Wellbeing Programme on-line in response to the need to deliver more GP services on line due to the Corona Virus Pandemic.

 

Methods and type of data

*In depth semi-structured interviews with patients to evaluate the effectiveness of the on-line support programme  on their health and wellbeing.

*In depth semi-structured interview with the patient’s GP to assess the effectiveness of the programme from a GP perspective

*Patient Focus Group to explore group perspectives and group dynamics

*Participant -observer study of the patients What’s App self-support group

 

Three key words

BAME Diabetes Support

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Challenges faced by VSCE leaders during Covid- 19 – PI: Emily Dyson

 

Project lead

Emily Dyson

 

Project lead email

emily@ivar.org.uk

 

Project lead institution

Institute for Voluntary Action Research

 

Website (optional)

https://www.ivar.org.uk/covid-19/

 

Funder, if any

Tudor Trust, Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, John Lyon’s Charity, Pears Foundation

 

Primary research question

‘What are the experiences of VCSE leaders in the UK during the Covid-19 pandemic?’ and ‘How are they responding’;

 

Methods and type of data

Covid-19 peer support webinars held weekly for VCSE leaders. Each session brings together 10 leaders from organisations across the UK covering different fields and activities.  The sessions run for 90 minutes with a trained facilitator and researcher. Data is primarily qualitative with visualisations representing the breadth and range of organisations/ leaders that have participated.

 

Three key words

Covid-19, small VCSE organisatons, responding

 

Project status

Analysis

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

Briefings are being published from the sessions fortnightly on the key challenges faced by leaders, responses and adaptations, and what support is needed for these leaders/ organisations. Please find the briefings here:  https://www.ivar.org.uk/covid-19-briefings/

 

MoVE – mobilising volunteers effectively – PI: Dr Jon Burchell

 

Project lead

Dr Harriet Thiery

 

Project lead email

h.thiery@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

University of Sheffield

 

Other project members

Dr Jon Burchell, j.burchell@sheffield.ac.uk, University of Sheffield

Dr Joe Cook, joanne.cook@hull.ac.uk, University of Hull

Dr Fiona Walkley, fiona.walkley@hull.ac.uk, University of Hull

Dr Erica Ballantyne, e.e.ballantyne@sheffield.ac.uk, University of Sheffield

Dr Silviya Nikolova, s.k.nikolova@leeds.ac.uk, University of Leeds

Dr Daniel Howdon, d.howdon@leeds.ac.uk, University of Leeds

 

Funder, if any

UKRI

 

Primary research question

How is volunteering is being facilitated by local authorities and VCSE organisations in order to respond to the needs of communities during the COVID-19 pandemic?

 

Methods and type of data

Interviews with local authority and VCSE partners

Econometric analysis of big data from two national platforms co-ordinating COVID-19 volunteering

Detailed analysis of a sample of six case study local authorities

 

Three key words

volunteering, communities, social action

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

The impact of coronavirus on Voluntary Community Organisations associated with Interchange. – PI: Louise Hardwick

 

Project lead

Louise Hardwick

 

Project lead email

louiseha@liverpool.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

The University of Liverpool

 

Other project members

Steering group and research team

Andrew Kirton – University of Liverpool – A.W.Kirton@liverpool.ac.uk

Mike Hogan – Interchange trustee – mikehoganliverpool@yahoo.com

Lindsey Metcalf – Liverpool John Moores University – L.J.Metcalf@ljmu.ac.uk

Claudette Graham – Interchange – cvgraham@liverpool.ac.uk

Student representative – tbc

 

Primary research question

The response of the community partner to coronavirus and the impact on the organisation and provision offered

 

Methods and type of data

Qualitative data will be gathered through 50 semi-structured interviews with representatives from associated community partners. These will be conducted via video. The sample frame will be determined by clustering beneficiary groups together. The envisaged clusters of 5 community partners providing services to: Asylum seekers/refugees/ resettlement; Children and young people ; Ex-offenders; Wellbeing/mental health; Women/domestic abuse; Homelessness; Older people; BAME; Disability;  Community and welfare advice.

Additionally, quantitative data will also be gathered through an online survey using the JISC software that will be made available to any local community organisations interested in participating in the study.

 

Three key words

coronavirus; community welfare organisations; volunteering;

 

Project status

Planning / bidding

 

Forum Research – COVID-19 and the Future of Volunteering for Development – PI: James O’Brien

 

Project lead 

James O’Brien

 

Project lead email

jobrien@forum-ids.org

 

Project lead institution

International Forum for Volunteering in Development (Forum)

 

Other project members

TBC

 

Website (optional)

https://forum-ids.org/news/forum-research-project-on-covid-19-and-the-future-of-volunteering-for-development/

 

Funder, if any

Forum/Norec

 

Primary research question

How can volunteer-involving organisations innovate new areas of growth in their programmes to deliver volunteering for development in the months and years ahead? How can the volunteering for development sector better position itself to respond to the particular challenges and opportunities that will result from COVID?

 

Methods and type of data

Interviews/survey of Forum members, other volunteer-involving organisations and partner organisations. Review of Forum resources on COVID-response.

 

Three key words

volunteering innovation post-COVID

 

Project status

Planning / bidding

 

Trust, human rights and civil society within mixed economies of welfare – PI: Paul Chaney

 

Project lead 

Paul Chaney

 

Project lead email

ChaneyP@cardiff.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

WISERD, Cardiff University

 

Other project members

Christala Sophocleous: Sophocleousc1@cardiff.ac.uk

 

Daniel Wincott: WincottD’cardiff.ac.uk

 

Funder, if any

ESRC

 

Primary research question

A comparative study of civil society, trust and human rights in mixed economies of welfare exploring the challenges facing CSOs as they deliver and shape welfare (adult community-based social-care) in the context of the corona virus pandemic; examining how relationships and action are mediated by understandings of trust and human-rights.

 

Methods and type of data

Key actor qualitative interviews across the 4 UK polities at local and national level. The original research instrument has been adapted in part, to include some questions on CSOs’ views and experience of the global corona virus pandemic and associated government policy.

 

Documentary analysis of UK and territorial government policy framing of the voluntary sector and the Corona Virus crisis in the context of community-based social care

 

Three key words

Welfare pluralism, voluntary sector, trust

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Developing support for those bereaved during the Covid-19 pandemic – PI: Debbie Kerslake

 

Project lead

Debbie Kerslake

 

Project lead email

Debbie.kerslake3@gmail.com

 

Project lead institution

BRIC Birmingham Research in the Community (formerly USE-IT! Birmingham University)

 

Other project members

Aleksandra Kazlowska and Lisa Goodson – Birmingham University

 

Funder, if any

BVSC – USE-IT! Birmingham University Legacy

 

Primary research question

How can communities support those who have experienced a bereavement during the Covid-19 pandemic, recognising and remembering those who have died and supporting people in their grief and bereavement?

 

Methods and type of data

Qualitative and quantitative – 15 in-depth interviews and 30 questionnaires

 

Three key words

Bereavement Community Support

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Engaging Individuals and Communities in the development of a ‘Patchwork Meadow’ across Birmingham – PI: Alison Thompson

 

Project lead  

Alison Thompson

 

Project lead email

alison13.at@googlemail.com

 

Project lead institution

Birmingham Research in the Community (BRIC)- formerly USE-IT! Community research team under the auspices of Birmingham University.

 

Other project members

Aleksandra Kazlowska, A.Kazlowska@bham.ac.uk, University of Birmingham

 

Lisa Goodsen, L.J.GOODSON@bham.ac.uk, University of Birmingham

 

Funder, if any

BVSC (USE-IT)

 

Primary research question

– What is the impact of the ‘Patchwork Meadow’ in relation to community connecting, increasing the number of pollinators and improving people’s health and well-being. What would motivate individuals and organisations to participate in the ‘Patchwork Meadow’?

 

Methods and type of data

Qualitative- 10 in-depth interviews with individuals and organisations that have participated in the ‘Patchwork Meadow’ and Covid-19 mutual support groups.

Quantitative- 10 questionnaires from individuals who chose not to participate in the project.

Data will be collected on:-

– The most effective approaches to engage individuals and organisations in planting pocket meadows in both private and public spaces;

– The effectiveness of the materials that have been used in the pilot.

– The most appropriate tools to measure the impact of the ‘Patchwork Meadow’ on an ongoing basis;

– The support that may be required by individuals and organisations to maintain their meadow on an ongoing  basis;

– The ideas of individuals in relation to the development of pocket meadows within their neighbourhood;

– How the community structures put into place to support local residents through Covid-19 could be used to engage local people in the ‘Patchwork Meadow’.

 

Three key words

Meadows, communities, environment

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

 

Solidarity in a time of crisis: the role of mutual aid in the COVID-19 pandemic – PI: Michael Roy

 

Project lead  

Michael Roy

 

Project lead email

michael.roy@gcu.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU)

 

Other project members

Simon Teasdale, GCU (Simon.Teasdale@gcu.ac.uk)

Jack Rendall, GCU (Jack.Rendall@gcu.ac.uk)

Maeve Curtin, GCU (Maeve.Curtin@gcu.ac.uk)

 

Funder, if any

Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office

 

Primary research question

How, and in what ways, do mutual aid groups complement, enhance, or undermine formal public health provision in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic?

 

Methods and type of data

Using a web-platform to conduct online ethnography across three regions in Scotland (urban, peri-urban, and rural; n=30), this study captures real-time insights from individuals participating in community and neighbourhood-based mutual aid efforts. These online activities include ongoing journal entries and discussion boards that specifically capture daily involvements with mutual aid efforts (e.g. online signposting, packing food bags, etc) and perspectives on the future of mutual aid groups, their interaction with other community bodies, and community resilience moving forward. Online, semi-structured, qualitative interviews will be used to augment insights garnered from online activities. The multiple sources of qualitative evidence and various kinds of data (from interviews, observations, online materials, documents) will be synthesised, coded, and triangulated to develop coherent and plausible conclusions. Online focus groups with formal health providers and civil society leaders will be conducted in the final stages of the study to discuss these preliminary conclusions, gain their perspectives, and enhance validity.

 

Three key words

Mutual Aid, Online Ethnography, Public Health

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

Stage 1 – Observation Period (2-3 Months) Data collection began on 15th June 2020.

Stage 2 – Analysis Period (3 Months)

Stage 3 – Write-up Period (1 Month)

 

Foodbank and homeless donations during Covid and the recession-19 – PI: Peter Taylor-Gooby

 

Project lead

Peter Taylor-Gooby

 

Project lead email

p.f.taylor-gooby@kent.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

University of Kent

 

Other project members

Dr Tomas Petricek, University of Kent

 

Methods and type of data

Time-series data-scraping on the main crowd-funding websites to harvest data on the trajectory of appeals and donations and the amounts raised.

Covers Food-banks and Homeless Persons charities.

Dates 1.1.2020- 31-12-2020

 

Three key words

Foodbank, Homeless, Data-scraping

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Summary of key findings (when applicable)

  1. Donations skyrocketed during the early lock down but have declined in pace with the number of cases. We are concerned that there will be high demand during the recession, but a lower level of generosity.
  2. Preliminary analysis of the regional pattern indicates that donations were much higher in richer areas.

 

Youth unemployment and civil society under devolution: a comparative analysis of sub-state welfare regimes – PI: Dr Sioned Pearce

 

Project lead

Dr Sioned Pearce

 

Project lead email

pearces11@cardiff.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Cardiff University

 

Website (optional)

https://wiserd.ac.uk/research/research-projects/youth-unemployment-and-civil-society-under-devolution-comparative

 

Funder, if any

Economic and Social Research Council

 

Primary research question

How do civil society organisations (size, geography, activity, culture, approach) working in youth unemployment (which will be severely impacted due to Covid-19 and lockdown) compare between the four devolved territories of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland?

 

Methods and type of data

The study takes a mixed methods approach in two phases.  This approach is modelled closely on the work of Baglioni and Giugni (2014) to ensure the findings contribute to the wider field of CSO involvement in youth unemployment across Europe. (1) It will use secondary data at national and sub-national levels to classify different types and scales of CSO involvement in youth unemployment across the UK. (2) Gaps in the audit will be filled using data from local authorities and CSOs themselves. The final dataset will be the first of its kind detailing civil society activity in youth unemployment across the UK. (3) Initial findings will then be developed using in-depth interviews with CSOs and (devolved) policy actors

 

Three key words

Youth unemployment, devolution, civil society

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

The role of Local Infrastructure Organisations in the COVID 19 response – PI: Carol Jacklin-Jarvis

 

Project lead 

Carol Jacklin-Jarvis

 

Project lead email

c.e.j.jarvis@open.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

The Open University

 

Other project members

Daniel Haslam – daniel.haslam@open.ac.uk – The Open University

 

Primary research question

How do local infrastructure organisations (LIOs) act as local leadership actors in collaborative responses to the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

Methods and type of data

Case study design – 3-5 different cases

Three primary data collection methods:

1) data from websites, social media, and other publicly available documents in digital form

2) internal LIO communications

3) Interviews with key stakeholders

 

Three key words

Infrastructure, Leadership, Collaboration

 

Project status

Planning / bidding

 

Evaluation of Leeds Neighbourhood Networks’ Response to COVID 19 – PI: Chris Dayson

 

Project lead

Chris Dayson

 

Project lead email

c.dayson@shu.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Sheffield Hallam University

 

Other project members

University of Birmingham, We Research It

 

Funder, if any

Centre for Ageing Better

 

Primary research question

To understand the role neighbourhood-level organisations have played supporting older people during the COVID 19 pandemic

 

Methods and type of data

‘Real Time Evaluation’ methodology, including:

– Interviews will 20 NNs to understand their role in the pandemic response

– Interviews with 5 stakeholders to capture broader insights on the LNN pandemic response

– A monthly ‘Right Now Survey’ to capture a light touch data on a rolling basis

– A ‘real time panel’ of 8 NNs to capture more detailed data on rolling basis

 

Three key words

Neighbourhoods; Health Ageing

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing

 

Innovation and Enterprise Across the Social Economy in Recovery from Covid-19 – PI: James Rees

 

Project lead

James Rees

 

Project lead email

james.rees@wlv.ac.uk

 

Project lead institution

Institute for Community Research and Development

 

Other project members

Laura Caulfield; Sophie Wilson, BVSC; Sinead Ouillon and Paul Weller, CTPSR Coventry University

 

Funder, if any

West Midlands Combined Authority, Public Service Reform Directorate

 

Primary research question

How has civil society and the social economy responded to the crisis and what needs to be taken forward or further developed as we move into a ‘new normal’ way of working?

 

Methods and type of data

Primarily qualitative methods including:

– Desk-based review of published and unpublished documents

– Email call for evidence in early August, results collated by team

– Twenty rapid follow-up telephone interviews with regional experts/stakeholders

– 6-8 in depth case studies, based on semi-structured interviews, focusing on examples of ‘innovation, flexibility and enterprise’

– Two online focus groups to refine and co-create the emerging findings

 

Three key words

social economy, innovation, community

 

Project status

Data collection / literature reviewing