News

VSSN’s repository for research on Covid-19 and voluntary action

As part of VSSN’s goal to help maximise the visibility and impact of Voluntary Sector focussed research, we are collating research projects which focus on VCS and volunteering responses to, recovery from and implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. We have had a great response, and there are 18 studies to explore on this page.

If you would like your project to be visible on the VSSN website, please fill in the form here. It would be great to hear about projects in development as well as those in progress, as this should help to reduce any risk of duplication and open up possibilities of collaboration.

Read more and submit your research project here.

Voluntary Sector Review Call for Research Notes: COVID-19 and voluntary sector

Call for Research Notes

COVID-19 and voluntary sector

Voluntary Sector Review (VSR) invites original research notes on COVID-19 and voluntary sector for a rapid publication in early 2021.

The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly altered many aspects of voluntary sector: disruption to normal life, social distancing and lockdown measures, furlough, job losses and economic crisis have profoundly affected how voluntary sector organisations operate and individuals’ volunteering and donating behavior both in short- and long-term. There is an unprecedented and immediate need for up to date evidence and new theoretical understanding of the current situation, yet the scientific research and publication of findings as a full paper can take a long time. To address this need, Voluntary Sector Review is experimenting with research notes as a new format of publication. We invite scholars from across the globe to submit short research notes on their ongoing research related to COVID-19 and voluntary sector. We are looking for research notes with promising empirical research findings as well as theoretical discussions that help to understand the potential consequences of the current COVID-19 pandemic for voluntary sector. We seek research notes that make a clear and original contribution.

The research notes can include research outputs that cannot be considered as full research or methodology articles. For example, but not exclusively, they can present intriguing initial and/or time-sensitive results and observations,  advance a new idea, theoretical perspective or methodological approach, describe new data available for other scholars or publish a brief summary of a study that is usually difficult to publish (e.g. with non-significant results).

Submission deadline is October 30th, 2020. We invite research notes of short to medium length (2,000 to 4,000 words). Research notes may follow a less strict paper structure than full papers but still need to make a valuable contribution to the study of voluntary sector.  They must have an abstract and must use referencing and follow VSR manuscript formatting guidelines. Please type ‘Research Note’ at the top of your manuscript, then submit it through Editorial Manager, as a ‘Research article’.  All research notes will undergo a fast track peer-review. A selection of 3-5 notes will be published in March 2021 issue and the rest scheduled for publication in next issues.

For pre-submission queries, prospective contributors are encouraged to contact the corresponding editor Dr. Daiga Kamerāde: d.kamerade-hanta@salford.ac.uk

Online forum for new researchers – How to disseminate your research findings

Online forum for new researchers – How to disseminate your research findings

Thursday, September 24 from 1-2pm   

Our next session for new researchers will focus on ways to disseminate research findings beyond journal and book publication – this will include social media, blogs, posters, videos and building networks.  This will be an open forum for new researchers in the field of voluntary studies and voluntary action hosted by Vita Terry, Jon Dean and Jane Cullingworth from VSSN’s steering group.  We have two fabulous speakers:

Please note, you do not need to be a member of VSSN to participate – however, we do encourage you to join VSSN.  VSSN is a membership driven organisation that relies on its members for support.  Membership offers a number of benefits and is on a sliding scale; you can find out more here.

Zoom link: https://uofglasgow.zoom.us/j/97885273954

Please contact Jane Cullingworth at janecullingworthvssn@gmail.com for more information.

Voluntary Sector Review supports eConference with access to free journal content!

Thanks to Policy Press, the following Voluntary Sector Review Editors’ Choice articles are free to access until 31 January 2021, in support of our eConference arranged for 7th and 8th September 2020.

https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/journals/voluntary-sector-review/editors-choice

The food insecurity section of our Living in a COVID-19 economy collection features four VSR articles on the topic of food banks.

https://bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/journals/covid-economy##foodinsecurity

This is free to read until 31 October.

We have also made the themed section: Re-reading civil society action for environmental sustainability free to read until 31 October.

https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/vsr/2020/00000011/00000002

Find out more about Voluntary Sector Review and how to submit an article here:

https://policy.bristoluniversitypress.co.uk/journals/voluntary-sector-review

 

 

‘Times like these’: Researching civil society responses to and recovery from COVID-19 Voluntary Sector and Volunteering Research e-Conference 2020 – provisional programme

After much hard work, VSSN, NCVO and BVSC are ready to announce the provisional programme for the e-Conference organised for Monday 7th September and Tuesday 8th September.

 

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

 

Day 1: Monday 7 September 2020

 

10.00 – 11.00 OPENING PLENARY SESSION: FRAMING CIVIL SOCIETY RESPONSES TO COVID 19
11.00 – 11.30 Morning break
11.30 – 13.00 SESSION 1A: PHILANTHROPY, FUNDRAISING, FUNDING AND COVID-19
SESSION 1B: VOLUNTEER MOBILISATION IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19: INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL AND LOCAL INSIGHTS
13. 00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.30 SESSION 2A: COMMUNITIES AND MUTUAL AID DURING THE COVID 19 PANDEMIC – CONCEPTUAL INSIGHTS
SESSION 2B: VOLUNTARY AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS AND COVID-19 – MICRO, MESO AND MACROERSPECTIVES

 

16.00- 17.00 VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW: AN INFORMAL SESSION WITH THE EDITORS

 

Day 2: Tuesday 8 September 2020

 

10.00 – 11.00 OPENING PLENARY SESSION: LIVING CIVIL SOCIETY RESPONSES TO COVID-19
11.00 – 11.30 Morning break
11.30 – 13.00 SESSION 3A: VOLUNTEERING EXPERIENCES DURING COVID-19: INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANISATIONAL PERSPECTIVES AND IMPLICATIONS
SESSION 3B: CIVIL SOCIETY AND COVID-19: CROSS-CUTTING ISSUES
13. 00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.30 SESSION 4A: VOLUNTARY AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS AND COVID-19 – MICRO, MESO AND MACRO PERSPECTIVES
SESSION 4B: COMMUNITIES AND MUTUAL AID DURING THE COVID 19 PANDEMIC – INSIGHTS FROM THE FRONTLINE
16.00- 17.00 BOOK LAUNCH: CELEBRATING THE LAUNCH OF TWO NEW BOOKS

 

DETAILED PROGRAMME

Day 1: Monday 7 September 2020

 

10.00 – 11.00 OPENING PLENARY SESSION: FRAMING CIVIL SOCIETY RESPONSES TO COVID 19

Professor Tracey M. Coule, Sheffield Hallam University, ‘Bringing organization back in: Deliberating organizational means and ends in ‘times like these’

Chris Dayson, Associate Professor, Sheffield Hallam University, ‘Re-making state-civil society relationships during the COVID 19 pandemic? An English perspective’

11.00 – 11.30 Morning break
11.30 – 13.00 SESSION 1A: PHILANTHROPY, FUNDRAISING, FUNDING AND COVID-19

Chair:

Reserves and financial vulnerability of UK voluntary organisations after COVID-19

John Mohan, Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham and David Clifford, University of Southampton

 The impact of COVID-19 on the foundation and dissolution of charitable organisations: A cross-national comparison

Diarmuid McDonnell* and Alasdair Rutherford**, *UK Data Service, **University of Stirling           

Learning in Lockdown: An exploration of active citizenship education for children and young people in lockdown

Alison Body, University of Kent

Navigating new terrain in an emergency grants programme

Sally Vivyan, Open University

The great fundraising furlough swap? Exploring the development and implications of fundraisers’ “furlonteering” during the COVID-19 lockdown.

Lesley Alborough, University of Kent

 

SESSION 1B: VOLUNTEER MOBILISATION IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19: INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL AND LOCAL INSIGHTS

Chair:

Community-based volunteering in response to COVID-19: The COV-VOL Project

Julie MacInnes*, Kat Frere-Smith**, Bridget Jones***, Sabrena Jaswal*, Tamsyn Eida*, Vanessa Abrahamson*, Rebecca Sharp****, Heather Gage***, and Patricia Wilson*

*University of Kent, **Brighton and Sussex Medical School, ***University of Surrey

****NIHR Applied Research Collaboration, Kent, Surrey and Sussex

Mobilising volunteers effectively during the COVID-19 pandemic

Harriet Thiery*, Jenny McNeill*, Joanne Cook**, Jon Burchell*, Fiona Walkley**, Erica Ballantyne*,

*University of Sheffield ** University of Hull,

Scotland – Lessons learned in managing the supply of formal volunteers during the COVID-19 crisis and recovery period

Alan Stevenson and Debbie Maltman, Volunteer Scotland

Pandemic recovery and volunteering in Wales – challenges, opportunities, and a research agenda

Emma Taylor-Collins*, Fiona Liddell**, and Hannah Durrant*

*Wales Centre for Public Policy, **Wales Council for Voluntary Action

Volunteering and COVID-19: disrupting geographies of voluntary action

Matt Baillie Smith and Bianca Fadel, Northumbria University

 

13. 00 – 14.00 Lunch

 

14.00 – 15.30 SESSION 2A: COMMUNITIES AND MUTUAL AID DURING THE COVID 19 PANDEMIC – CONCEPTUAL INSIGHTS

Chair:

Locally rooted: community organising in times of crisis

Marilyn Taylor, IVAR

Apart but not Alone? A cross-sectional study of neighbour support in a major UK urban area during the COVID-19 lockdown

Michele Biddle, UWE

Learning from international emergency responses to inform Scotland’s COVID-19 recovery approach

Cathy Hynds, Volunteer Scotland

From Kropotkin to COVID-19: the role of mutual aid associations in democratic participation

Jurgen Grotz*,  Michael Locke and Michael Ashe**

*IVR, **Volunteer Centre Kensington and Chelsea

The Role of Mutual Aid in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Case Studies from Scotland

Jack Rendall, Maeve Curtin, Michael Roy and Simon Teasdale, Glasgow Caledonian University

 

SESSION 2B: VOLUNTARY AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS AND COVID-19 – MICRO, MESO AND MACRO PERSPECTIVES

Chair: Jane Cullingworth, University of Glasgow

Delivering community impact through a coordinated VCS response: The Sheffield Hub Network story

Adam Batty, Voluntary Action Sheffield

Third sector organisations and their essential role in Covid 19 response and recovery – a case study of Glasgow

Claire Bynner, University of Glasgow

 Community Businesses and Covid-19

Amelia Byrne, Power to Change and The Institute for Community Studies

Monitoring the impact of COVID-19 on people experiencing homelessness

Jo Brown, Groundswell

16.00- 17.00 VOLUNTARY SECTOR REVIEW: AN INFORMAL SESSION WITH THE EDITORS

Bring along a glass of wine / cup of tea and chat to the editors about getting published in VSR

 

Day 2: Tuesday 8 September 2020

Time Session

 

Location
10.00 – 11.00 OPENING PLENARY SESSION: LIVING CIVIL SOCIETY RESPONSES TO COVID-19

Karl Wilding (NCVO), Anna Fowlie (SCVO), Brian Carr (BVSC), and Affan Cheema (Islamic Relief Worldwide)

 

11.00 – 11.30 Morning break
11.30 – 13.00 SESSION 3A: VOLUNTEERING EXPERIENCES DURING COVID-19: INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANISATIONAL PERSPECTIVES AND IMPLICATIONS

Chair:

“Just to hear your voice is so lovely”: The health and wellbeing effects of stopping their volunteering as a result of the COVID-19 crisis on older volunteers

Jurgen Grotz, IVR, UEA

The response of volunteers in sport to covid 19

Geoff Nichols*, Lindsay Findlay King** and Fiona Reid***

*University of Sheffield, **University of Northumbria, ***Glasgow Caledonian University

Being neighbours during lockdown: experiences from an outer city estate

Stephanie Denning, Coventry University

 Examining the motivations and emotions linked to the formation of a Voluntary sewing group formed in response to Covid-19

Beverley Gilbert, University of Worcester

Information and Referral Service for Seniors in British Columbia, Canada: Learning from COVID-19

Karen Lok Yi Wong*,**,***, Andrew Sixsmith** and Leslie Remun*

*411 Seniors Centre, **Science and Technology for Aging Research Institute, Simon Fraser University, ***School of Social Work, University of British Columbia

 

SESSION 3B: CIVIL SOCIETY AND COVID: CROSS-CUTTING ISSUES

Chair:

 The role of Local Infrastructure Organisations in the COVID 19 response

Carol Jacklin-Jarvis and Daniel Haslam, Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership, The Open University

Embedding a culture of learning: LDCVS and its sounding Board

Jill Anderson and Sam Riches, Lancaster District Voluntary and Community Solutions

Dancing With Elephants: COVID-19 and the response to diverse community needs in Camden

Julie Christie-Webb, Kevin Nunan and Hilary Barnard, Voluntary Action Camden

Community action in a pandemic

Fay Holland, Groundwork UK

 Social surveys are now more important than ever: what can the data tell us?

Patty Doran, UK Data Service

13. 00 – 14.00 Lunch

 

14.00 – 15.30 SESSION 4A: VOLUNTARY AND COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS AND COVID-19 – MICRO, MESO AND MACRO PERSPECTIVES

Chair: Sophie Wilson, BVSC Centre for Voluntary Action

The impact of Covid-19 on the voluntary sector working in criminal justice

Anne Fox, Clinks

Making it stick: The importance of lived experience insight in systems change

Nathan Dick and Andy Williams, Revolving Doors Agency

Voluntary and community organisations moving from crisis to recovery

Vita Terry, Katie Turner, Houda Davies, Annie Caffyn and Sonakshi Anand

IVAR

 Third sector responses to Covid-19 and poverty in Scotland

Laura Robertson, The Poverty Alliance

 

SESSION 4B: COMMUNITIES AND MUTUAL AID DURING THE COVID 19 PANDEMIC – INSIGHTS FROM THE FRONTLINE

Chair:

The role of community creativity in the time of COVID 19

Sarah Boiling, Anousheh Haghdadi and Amanda Smethurst, Independent researchers

How nonprofit organizations in the City of High Point (North Carolina) responded to COVID-19

Patrick Harman, Hayden-Harman Foundation

Community Responses to COVID-19

Wendy Sugarman*, Richard Usher* and Rob Macmillan**

*Just Ideas, **Sheffield Hallam University

#brumtogether, a study into the impact of the Birmingham and Solihull Local Delivery Pilot on community resilience in the face of Covid-19

Steven Rose, Karen Creavin and Naomi Lynch, The Active Wellbeing Society

A ‘Real Time Evaluation’ of neighbourhood-based projects for older people during COVID 19 pandemic in Leeds

Chris Dayson*, Jan Gilbertson*, Emma Bimpson*, Chris Damm*, Angela Ellis Paine**, Helen Kara*** and Luke Price****

*Sheffield Hallam University, ** Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham, *** Independent researchers, ****Centre for Ageing Better

16.00- 17.00 BOOK LAUNCH: CELEBRATING THE LAUNCH OF TWO NEW BOOKS

Jon Dean: The good glow: Charity and the symbolic power of doing good

Alison Body: Children’s charities in crisis: Early intervention and the state

 

Emotions and feelings in voluntary sector work: Explorations from research and practice  

Call for papers for the first seminar to be held on 10.30am – 4.00pm, 22nd October 2020

 We are grateful for a small grant from the Voluntary Sector Studies Network (VSSN) to organise a series of events we are running from autumn 2020 on the role of emotions and feelings within voluntary sector work: in community, voluntary, social enterprise or co-operative settings. This may be in the UK, elsewhere in Europe or the world.

About the seminar series

This series seeks to bring together the community, social and psychological realm. The aim of these seminars is to explore the effect and role of emotions and feelings in the Voluntary Sector. Seminars will address this by considering cross-over issues through informed discussion, gaining perspectives from speakers with professional knowledge and co-learning through small group work, involving practitioner experience and research insights. These can later lead to articles, blogs or web posts in academic or practitioner journals. You are welcome to come as a participant or presenter.

Location and on-line

The three seminars will be in Preston (10.30am – 4.00pm, 22nd October 2020), Bristol or south west (March 2021) and London (June 2021). In view of current restrictions due to the Covid-19 virus, all three events will happen on-line and include a mixture including face-to-face events if, or when, Covid-19 restrictions are lifted.

To register your place at the first seminar on the 22nd October please complete the form on Eventbrite as numbers are limited.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/emotions-and-feelings-in-voluntary-sector-work-tickets-108981157576

How to keep in touch

If you have any questions the seminars please contact the initial planning group now: Dr Mike Aiken (Brighton) mikeloscaminos@myphone.coop, Dr Vita Terry (London) vita@ivar.org.uk and Dr Julian Manley (Preston) jymanley@uclan.ac.uk.

Guide to submitting a proposa

1. Aims and initial themes

The aims of these seminars are to encourage joint work and the sharing of insights between the sometimes separate arenas of the social (community, voluntary, social enterprise, co-operative work) with the psychological (the affective realm of emotions and feelings).

Attention to the psychological and the social is also important for workers and volunteers operating in tough urban/ rural communities facing daily anxiety in fragile organisations. The daily stresses and tensions of managers facing tough work, performance targets and disadvantaged communities may present splitting denial and other defences as survival strategies. For example, the entrepreneurial founder of a much praised project may feel locked into a role where their exit may lead to project closure. Trustees can face decisions that conflict with their values and beliefs.

2. Intended participants

2.1     Researchers, practitioners, activists, academics, policy makers and funders engaged in the Community, Voluntary and Co-operative sector (CVC sector – including voluntary, community, social enterprise or co-operative action).

2.2     People active in social, psychosocial or critical perspectives related to the affective realm – of feelings and emotions – within local communities.

2.3     Foundations, funders and local policy makers.

3. About your theme and contribution

Your contribution to the day seminars could be presenting a paper; organising a panel of speakers; facilitating a discussion, workshop or roundtable; analysing a particular situation. You can also contribute as a participant without presenting

Your theme may be a starting question/puzzle or dilemma; or a link to a theoretical framework or debate or contemporary or historical situation, or a cross-disciplinary insight, or international perspective that links to voluntary, community, social enterprise or co-operative action.

You may wish to start by exploring a key topic/puzzle/dilemma relating to work you have been involved in, or affecting practitioners or contemporary practice within voluntary, community, social enterprise or co-operative action.

Participants are welcome to draw from different disciplinary backgrounds (social theory, sociology, psychology or therapeutic studies, women’s studies, post-colonial studies etc) as long as there is a link to voluntary, community, social enterprise or co-operative action.

4.  The format for the session 

Your contribution could be:

4.1     a presentation (with space for questions and discussion)

4.2     a panel with 2 or 3 speakers

4.3     a workshop or carousel format with participants moving between tables that    highlight different questions

4.4     a short informal 10 minute input on a key issue or vignette

4.5     any other format you wish to propose (please advise, or discuss with us).

Please note your panel, presentation, workshop or other format should also allow time for some discussion, interaction, or questions. In total your slot should be either 30 or 40 minutes (that includes at least 10 minutes for questions/discussion.  You can also propose a short 10 minute slot for presenting a key issue/dilemma that you have encountered in your work that you feel needs researching further.

5. Outcomes from the seminars

The outcomes from the seminars may develop during the series. These may include:

5.1     Plans for joint articles (academic but also practitioner journals or magazines (including Voluntary Sector Studies, Civil Society, Organisational and Social Dynamics); contributions to the VSSN annual conference in September 2021; and to VSSN day seminars

6. Ethical considerations and questions

The organisers are mindful of the sensitive nature of research and personal experience that may be shared within these seminars. Customary support practices and ethical procedures will therefore be adopted to offer safe and confidential spaces where appropriate.

7. Timings

If you would like to submit a proposal for the 22nd October please send an abstract of no more than 250 words to Dr Mike Aiken: mikeloscaminos@myphone.coop or Dr Vita Terry: vita@ivar.org.uk. The deadline for abstracts is the 1st September and we will aim to let you know if you are successful by the 24th September.

 

Reminder: Covid-19 and voluntary action research repository

As part of VSSN’s goal to help maximise the visibility and impact of Voluntary Sector focussed research, we are collating research projects which focus on VCS and volunteering responses to, recovery from and implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. We have had a great response, and there are 18 studies to explore on this page.

If you would like your project to be visible on the VSSN website, please fill in the form here. It would be great to hear about projects in development as well as those in progress, as this should help to reduce any risk of duplication and open up possibilities of collaboration.

Read more and submit your research project here.

Duncan Scott – a eulogy

By now many colleagues will have heard the terribly sad news that our colleague and longstanding VSSN stalwart Duncan Scott has passed away. He died on 18th May after a severe stroke.

Duncan was a pioneer and champion of voluntary sector research in the UK, and at the forefront of landmark discussions which led to the formation of VSSN back in the 1990s. He promoted voluntary sector studies in academia, through his long career as a Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer at the Department of Social Policy at the University of Manchester. He researched, wrote and spoke about a wide range of topics, often with a practical focus, including funding voluntary organisations, volunteering and service delivery contracts, social enterprise, rural deprivation and voluntary action and qualitative research methods.

Beyond this, and perhaps more significantly, he was a tireless advocate for community-based research. He recognised the importance of supporting those in voluntary organisations and community groups who needed to get vital research done quickly, but who had neither ready access to all the resources on offer in Universities, nor the sometimes breezy academic confidence about research methods. He played significant advisory and committee roles with, for example, the Institute for Volunteering Research, Greater Manchester Centre for Voluntary Organisation, Third Sector Research Centre and of course VSSN.

Duncan was very supportive of new researchers and doctoral students, finding creative ways to bring people together to discuss common issues and concerns in voluntary sector research. In the early 2000s he convened several significant sessions through VSSN around qualitative research. This drew from and formed the basis of several important publications with colleagues, including ‘Moving Pictures: Realities of voluntary action’ (2000); ‘Close Work: Doing qualitative research
in the voluntary sector’ (2005) and ‘Researching voluntary and community action: The potential of qualitative case studies’ (2005). Duncan was always keen to discuss the messy practice of carrying out research, and often implored colleagues to bring case study research in the voluntary sector alive, to act as witnesses, to ‘show us that you’ve been there!’

Many of us will have worked with or come across Duncan in our research, and will treasure fond memories of his self-deprecating humour, his commitment, his support, gentle challenges, insight and wisdom, and in the end of simply having spent time with him.

To help mark Duncan’s contribution to voluntary sector studies, we have set up a padlet page for colleagues to share reflections. You can access the page by clicking on this link: https://padlet.com/angelaellispaine/DuncanScott. Simply visit the page and click on the + sign to add your comments.

Rob Macmillan
Sheffield Hallam University

Development grant projects about to go live!

We are proud to announce the results of the latest round of development grants which are all described below and we encourage members and others to get in touch with those delivering the projects and to get involved.

Mike Aiken, Vita Terry and Julian Manley:  Emotions and feelings in voluntary sector work: Explorations from research and practice

We would like to thank VSSN for the small development grant we have been awarded which will support us to set up a series of events from autumn 2020 on the role of emotions and feelings within voluntary sector work. This series seeks to bring together the community, social and psychological realm. Several of us in VSSN and beyond have already been discussing these cross-disciplinary themes as they affect – or intersect with – our existing research. The aim of these seminars is to explore the cross-over issues through informed discussion, gaining insight from speakers with professional insight and co-learning through small group work, involving practitioner experience and research insights.

The three events will potentially be held in Preston (provisionally 20th or 22nd October 2020), Bristol or South West (March 2021) and London (June 2021). However, in light of the current restrictions due to Covid-19 we will hold a mix of on-line and face-to-face events if or when restrictions are lifted.

The initial planning group is composed of Dr Mike Aiken (Brighton), Dr Vita Terry (London) and Dr Julian Manley (Preston). We will set up a distribution list shortly but if you would like to be kept in touch, or contribute and suggest themes please contact us:

Dr Mike Aiken on mikeloscaminos@myphone.coop or Dr Vita Terry on vita@ivar.org.uk

 

Tot Foster, Open University:  Small charities use of video

There are so many barriers to small charities engaging with video, not the least lack of time and money. Yet the rewards can be great – enhancing social media presence, recording and communicating impact. This development grant will be spent on a day long training session for ten small charities in making no/low budget films. As part of her PhD Tot Foster developed a new design-based approach to video production, tailored to small charities. The feedback from the training will inform the next iteration of the production process which will then be converted into an online course such as a MOOC.  The training will be offered later this year to a network of London charities under the umbrella of the digital skills organisation Superhighways. If face to face is impossible then the grant offers an opportunity to deliver and evaluate an early version of the online course.

 

Philippa Davies, Cardiff University: Women leaders’ experiences of gender (in)equality in Welsh sport leadership

The main focus of my proposal is to share the results of my research, which examines women leaders’ experiences of gender (in)equality in Welsh sport leadership, back with the Welsh sport sector, and in particular, Welsh sport leaders. One of the main reasons I researched this topic, was to share anything useful back with the sector to hopefully help women and men sport leaders. I aim to share the results by creating a bi-lingual report which provides an overview of the results and also deliver seminars to present the results and answer any questions (either in person, or due to the current situation by webinar).

I hope to work with leaders within the sector to ensure as many sport leaders (both voluntary and paid), who would wish to, will be able to attend (whether in person or remotely). I am so excited to have the grant which means I can make sharing back the results a more impactful, professional and, hopefully, a useful process for the sport sector.